SECURITY MAPPING IN KIBERA

by: September 4th, 2017 comments: 0

As part of the internship we are having at Map Kibera Trust under the YouthMappers programme, one of the activities that we were involved in was the Security Mapping project in the months of June and July.  The project was aimed at highlighting the areas of concern within the region owing to the fact that it was an electioneering period in the country, and there was a need to update the security map since the last time it was updated and used was during the 2013 elections. Some of the features that we were going to map were safe and unsafe areas, street lights, health centers and police posts within the area.

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Prior to the mapping exercise, we had a training session at our offices under the leadership of Zacharia Muindi, our Mapping coordinator and team leader. In the training we were trained on how to use the GPS in collecting data and other tools like the questionnaire and camera. We grouped in twos, with local volunteers who had adequate knowledge of Kibera. The training went on well and we had a few practicals before heading to the field, this was to ensure that the tools were working and everyone was on the same page.

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The mapping experience was interesting and challenging at the same time. The interesting bit of it included working with the locals and getting to know the vast expanse of Kibera, which was actually intriguing. We also noticed that some areas were unique and different in terms of development; areas like Nyayo Highrise and Fort Jesus had modern housing and well planned infrastructure. On the same note we also realized other areas that were still lagging behind in terms of development like Mashimoni and Lindi Ward. However, the mapping exercise was also challenging-moving around the area was physically demanding. Despite of the challenges we all managed to capture all the points (data) that we intended to collect.

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From there we computed the data we collected using OSM editing tool Java script OpenStreetMap (JOSM) and uploading the data into OSM. What followed was designing of the Security Map and printing them out for distribution. The distribution exercise went on well and the maps were well received by most of our recipients such the D.C, AP inspector general, local NGOs that are working around peace initiatives in Kibera and the local community members. Through the interactions with the map and explanations from the team they were able to interpret the data very well and they acknowledged that the map is going of great help to the work that they are involved with.

This is a guest blog post by Peter Agenga and Phylister Mutinda, interns with Map Kibera from the Youth Mappers chapter of the University of Nairobi.

Occupy Playground results in Title Deeds for Public Schools

by: June 15th, 2015 comments: 0

Five months after Lang’ata Road Primary School students, parents and friends brought the issue of school land grabbing to international and national spotlight, the National Land Commission and nine child rights organizations today launched national guidelines for schools to apply for title-deeds. 

Also check out this new video by Kibera News Network about this issue!

However, informal schools within the settlements like Kibera Slum, which make up 96% of the schools there, will not benefit from this directive to acquire title deeds since they lie on government land until the land ownership issue is permanently sorted out.

Speaking at the event, the National Lands Commission Vice-Chairperson Mrs. Abigael Bagaya noted,

Since the Langata incident, the Government has taken action to secure schools across the country. The Commission has received 5000 applications from including Lang’ata Road Primary School. We have received complaints of land grabs from 350 schools. It is for this reason, we launch these national guidelines. We promise to issue all titles within 60 days of receipt.”

Also speaking at the event, Elimu Yetu Coalition Coordinator Janet Muthoni said,

The Right to Play and the Right to Education is provided in the key international conventions and the Constitution of Kenya. The Government must revoke the title deeds for the Lang’ata Road Primary School from the private developer. The Government needs to appoint or empower an alternative to the interdicted Registrar Sarah Mwenda. The vacuum caused by her absence is causing a delay in meeting the Presidential directive to the 5,000 schools awaiting tittle-deeds.”

Also present were the public interest campaigners Boaz Waruku and Irungu Housghton arrested in the January 2015 incident, Irungu, SID Associate Director said,

The courage of the children of Lang’ata Road has inspired a nation. Since January, there have been over thirty reclamations of schools and other public lands by the Government and active citizens. As we celebrate the African Day of the Child tomorrow on June 16 we honour their courage and call for all citizens and leaders to protect places of learning.”

Guide to Securing title deeds for schools:

Step 1- The school heads submit an application for a tittle deed to the Secretary, County Land Management Board

Step 2- The County Land Management Board (CLMB) will process the application to ensure it meets all requirements.

Step 3- CLMB approves the application and submits it to National Land Commission (NLC) for issuance of the letter of allotment.

Step 4- Pay administration fee for processing the title deed.

Step 5- NLC prepares the school’s lease document and submits to the Chief Land Registrar.

Step 6- The Chief Land Registrar registers the lease and issues a tittle deed to the school.

How you can report a case of Land-grabbing?

Step 1: Document the name of the school, plot number, county, total schools acreage, acreage grabbed, persons/agencies who have grabbed land and what they are using it for currently.

Step 2: Report the matter to the nearest police station and obtain an Occurrence Book (OB) number.

Step 3: You can report the information and OB number to a number of agencies and copy us. See (www.shuleyangu.co.ke)

By Joshua Ogure, Kibera News Network.

 

Map Kibera Trust at the UN Habitat 24th Governance Council

by: April 29th, 2013 comments: 0

The 24th UN HABITAT Governing Council (GC24) was held at the UN Complex Nairobi under the theme ‘sustainable urban development’, on the roles of cities in creating improved economic opportunities for all, with special reference to youth and women. The governing council serve as the intergovermental decision making body for UN-Habitat. The meeting was officially opened by newly elected Uhuru Kenyatta who emphasized youth and employment. He said youth issues are sidelined, and few are willing to talk about them, especially the need for youth to access information and employment.

Map Kibera Trust was privileged to participate, due to our work under the UN Habitat Youth Fund. We especially contributed to discussions in on the issues of ‘Safer Cities’ and environmental issues. Safer Cities encourages design at the level of local authority decision and policy making, focused on the most vulnerable, women and girls in the community. I presented how Map Kibera approaches the issue of security, one of our themes that has most impressed people in the community. I discussed the map and how it’s used for awareness with young ladies. The response was positive!

The rest of the youth discussion was engaging. A platform for discussion was held where young people went to enlighten each other on ideas to create jobs. A youth from Kibera and a member of Youth Advisory Board (YAB) presented, really helped us understand the issue by defining six points towards understanding job creation: E-ducation Everyone should be educated. E-xchange Exchange ideas towards job creation. E-mployment creation From the exchange of ideas, it will give you ideas on how to create jobs. E-quity After creating jobs you provide equal opportunity to everyone. E-mployment Everyone gets employment in the community. E-nterpreneuaship Everyone should market him/herself, especially using we should use ICT.

The Youth Caucus on the last day focused on youth inclusion. Youth shared real issues that affect them, issues that are sidelined, that no one is willing to talk about. When youth are enlightened they can focus on what they need and move forward. In contrast, a delegate from Uganda came out differently and said youth are there own enemies, they don’t think beyond financial issues. She encouraged youth to think about the long term, and address negative attitudes towards volunteering.

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