Mapping Counties with Participatory Budgeting

by: July 17th, 2018 comments: 0

Screen Shot 2018-07-16 at 11.48.05 AM

Kenya’s devolution process and constitutional reforms of 2010 means that Kenya’s counties, of which there are now 47, are directly responsible for a much greater amount of their local development. Some counties have integrated citizen participation in planning by embarking on an intensive annual participatory budgeting process, with support from the World Bank. But, in order to allow communities to directly plan and budget for development, counties realized that they needed better information about existing projects and features, best represented geographically. Many times, participatory budgeting (PB) groups were relying on memory or on hand-drawn paper maps of existing terrain and features in order to determine where they should place new water points, health centers, and other key new projects.

To help fill this gap, Map Kibera Trust, along with GroundTruth Initiative, have begun to work with two pilot counties, Makueni and Baringo, to create participatory digital maps with both citizen and county government mappers. Makueni has already been mapped in two pilot wards, including collecting feedback on county development project status and quality. Please see the maps here.

Screen Shot 2018-07-16 at 11.49.16 AM

The base map data is, of course, gathered on OpenStreetMap – including various key features such as roads, shops, landmarks, schools, as well as the PB projects themselves. However, the mappers also collect project feedback information using Open Data Kit (ODK) and store it separately. The digital maps are then created using MapBox tools to combine them together. While mapping, participants mark whether the project is completed or not, whether it’s in good shape or poor, and add a sentence about the project’s quality or impact. We intend for this aspect to be updated regularly in preparation for the annual budgeting meetings, so that citizens can get a sense of how their intended projects are faring. Therefore, the map also allows  those who take part in the budgeting process to see the extent to which the county is doing what they had intended. Each PB meeting will receive a printed map, so as not to have to rely on digital maps in locations with very little internet connectivity or even electricity.

Mobile data collection using ODK

Mobile data collection using ODK in Mbooni ward, Makueni.

Check out this great video showing the mapping in Mbooni ward of Makueni county, also illustrating the challenges of working across rural terrain. By engaging young residents of each locale, we hope to spread participatory mapping throughout Kenya, county by county.

Open Schools Kenya updated with Mathare info, new Kibera schools

by: November 7th, 2017 comments: 0

Open Schools Kenya has been recently updated, and we are now starting to add schools in Mathare! Working with Youth Mappers chapter at the University of Nairobi, Map Kibera has so far covered the “Mathare Village” area.  We are working to expand coverage to the entire Mathare slum, where Map Kibera has previously mapped and worked with citizen journalists (see Voice of Mathare and Map Mathare). OSK is also updated with new information on Kibera schools, including a number of closures, relocations, and new schools. Simply keeping the data current on the Kibera schools is a challenge, but schools are often in touch about changes. And, keeping our eyes and ears on the latest happenings in the community is after all what we do best.

The total number of mapped schools is now 415, including 355 in Kibera and 59 in Mathare. We hope to have all of Mathare covered in the next few months, and continue to expand coverage in 2018 to other areas of Nairobi and Kenya.

Please also see this recent research about Map Kibera for Making All Voices Count, which particularly notes OSK’s local impacts as a major achievement for open community data!

Screen Shot 2017-11-06 at 2.02.53 PM

Map Kibera takes part in White House mapathon!

by: July 7th, 2016 comments: 0

On Tuesday, Map Kibera and members of Tunapanda, a Kibera-based IT training school, held a mapathon in Nairobi to support the White House Mapathon, happening today.

13584702_898773990250067_8434004023133647901_o

Zach Wambua of Map Kibera demonstrates remote mapping on HOT Tasking Manager to Tunapanda’s team. (CC-by-SA)

The White House Mapathon celebrates the role of open mapping in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Participants actively map for malaria prevention in Mozambique via HOT Task 1988. The event is being hosted by the President’s Malaria Initiative, USAID, and the Peace Corps, with support from the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT).

Courtney Clark of the US Peace Corps introduces the White House Mapathon, image of Map Kibera/Tunapanda

Courtney Clark of the US Peace Corps introduces the White House Mapathon, with image of Map Kibera/Tunapanda’s mapping.